Five Minute Friday: “keep”

How does one follow such a month of such important, heavy, deep posts about one of the greatest injustices in our world (human trafficking)? That question has paralyzed me this week. That, and the fact that I haven’t had my usual writing time due to sick children for the better part of the last few weeks. I say this often, but it bears repeating – motherhood is *not* for the faint of heart. You have to be both scheduled and flexible (planning what you think will be best for each day/willing to flex with the needs as they arise each moment); gentle and firm; compassionate and consistent when it comes to limits/boundaries/discipline; taking the long view for your child while knowing in the short-term what you need to make it to the long view (i.e. – a half-hour of TV when you can’t take your 4-year-old twins’ whining anymore; or a night out with your husband even when your children beg you not to leave; or a Saturday morning coffee-date with a good friend who can listen and laugh about the antics and struggles of motherhood with you).

I have missed this (blogging) space this week. And it is good to be here again, joining the Five Minute Friday writing community who does just that – they keep me writing most Fridays! Five minutes of free-writing on a given topic. Certainly worth giving it a try: head over to Kate’s site to link up here.

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photo from homedit.com

photo from homedit.com

I’ve taken the rather ambitious and predictable January task of purging our home of unneeded clutter and things and toys and random-stuff-that-you-haven’t-used-since-you-got-it-as-a-wedding-gift-8-years-ago. Over and over again, I have been evaluating what is worth keeping, and what should be tossed, given away, or stored for the future. My list of what’s worthy to keep includes these qualities:

  • Quiet toys (i.e. – no loud sounds or flashing lights, if I can help it)
  • Staying power – timeless quality to it
  • I like it. You may laugh, but I realized that the first step for me in clearing the clutter is realizing how many things I’ve kept in our house because I felt like I should, or I’ve had it since third grade/etc. Silly, really. So I’m giving myself permission to get rid of what I don’t like in our home. Down with the thousands of mismatched picture frames and only-used-once appliances, and throw pillows I’ve held onto since college.
  • It serves a purpose now.

What if I likewise evaluated my life and my heart like this? If I looked to nurture qualities of my soul worth keeping, and sought God’s expulsive mercy and grace to be rid of what’s not? How would that change the way I spend my time? How I talk to my children and my husband? The way I engage in my church and my neighborhood? What would and would not be on my schedule?

Questions worth pondering. I would love to hear your answers as you have them.

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